JOURNÉES EUROPÉENNES DU PATRIMOINE

Affiche JEP-2014logo-ministere-de-la-culture-et-de-la-communication

 

 

 

 

 

 SEPTEMBER 20-21, 2014

Le week-end du 20 et 21 septembre 2014, les Journées du Patrimoine reviennent avec pour thème “Patrimoine culturel, patrimoine naturel”. Comme chaque année environ 16 000 sites publics ou privés seront ouverts au public.

This annual event is a unique opportunity to discover local heritage in all its splendour and variety by visiting sites and architectural features. A wide range of activities is organised throughout the department.

2014 Schedule:

Program in NICE 

Search in other Regions

France 3 Video HERE

 

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September Events in France

In Nice:france cartoon

Jeux de la Francophonie (Nice): 7-15 September, the 7th edition of this cultural and athletic youth event will take place with sporting, traditional and creative competitions between participants representing French-speaking nations from around the globe. www.nicetourisme.com

Nationwide events in France September 2014:

France Gourmet Week known as “Tous Au Restaurant”22-28 September 2014. All over France for a whole week restaurants will put offer a buy one meal, get one free menu. Search on the website for participating restaurants:www.tousaurestaurant.com

Fete de la Gastronomie 26-28 September, every corner of France will come alive with events to celebrate its UNESCO-listed ‘world intangible heritage’ status. From grand-scale concerts to local sing-a-longs, Michelin-star set menus to small village banquets, the country will be in lively spirits to celebrate one of its most popular claims to fame. www.economie.gouv.fr/fete-gastronomie

Journées Européennes du Patrimoine – European Heritage Days: 20 and 21 September across the whole country, hundreds of historical buildings, famous monuments, Government sites and places of interest – some of which are normally closed to the public, open their doors and welcome in visitors. It is an amazing opportunity to explore and find out more about some truly fantastic buildings in France. Discover the heritage of France, more about Journées Européennes du Patrimoine. www.journeesdupatrimoine.culture.fr/

 

AMUSEZ-VOUS BIEN!

Information Source: TheGoodLifeFrance

The Art of Baroque Dancing

What is baroque dance?

The term is used to refer to ballroom and theatrical dance of France, other Western European countries, and their colonies during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

Is baroque dance baroque (that is, highly decorated, ornamented, and so on)?

Well, sometimes. The steps can be highly decorated, curved shapes and paths are often used, and the choreographic thread is sometimes elaborately nonlinear.  But it can also have elements of classical order and symmetry, and even simplicity.

So why is it called baroque dance?

Presumably, partly by analogy with music and other arts of roughly the same period, and partly because it does have baroque elements.

History

The origins of the baroque dance are found in the court at Versailles during the reign of Louis XIV of France in the 1600s. The art of ballet was born under his rule, thanks to his passion for dance. Because of Louis XIV, balls, operas and the baroque dance played a pivotal role in the lifestyle at Versailles.

Baroque dancers at Vaux-le-Vicomte

Baroque dancers

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Louis XIV

Louis’ connection with the dance was personal. When he took the throne at a young age, according to Labelldanse.com, “his authority was opposed by a faction of nobles in a series of uprisings known as the ‘Frondes'”. After the Second Fronde was conquered, “Cardinal Mazarin (who ruled through the regent, Louis’ mother, Anne of Austria)” directed a ballet called “Le Ballet de la Nuit.” In the la Nuit, Louis danced the main role of the Rising Sun. While Louis acted In character as the sun, he warned that anyone who chose to oppose his power “would soon feel his heat.” This threat was directed towards the nobles, reminding them that their opposition to the royal authority would not be tolerated

Dance as a Weapon

After Louis had felt his power as the Rising Sun character, he employed dance with the mindset of it being used as a weapon of State. Due to his enthusiasm for dance, the establishment of the Academie Royale de la Danse emerged in 1661. From then on, other ballets and operas that were composed by other directors such as J.B. Lully, praised Louis as “the wisest, most powerful and benevolent ruler in Christendom.”

The Baroque Dance Spreads

The form of dancing gathered popularity through parts of Europe, England and Spain. Other ballrooms and operas embraced the court dance forms and began teaching what Louis had created. In 1738, French dancing masters traveled as far as Russia, where Jean-Baptiste Lande established a school that gradually became the school of the Kirov Ballet at the Maryinsky Threater. According to Labelledanse.com, other French dance instructors traveled to the New World where French ballroom dances became popular “in the salons of the governors of New France (Quebec) and later at Colonial assemblies in which George Washington danced the minuet.”

Baroque Dance Evolves

The baroque dance form that was made famous under the Sun King continued to thrive during reigns of Louis XV and Louis XVI. As the French Revolution began in the late 19th century, the dance grew closer to the modern form of dance known as classical ballet.

 

Source: ehow.com

Les Nuits du Sud in Vence

Les Nuits du Sud is an annual outdoor series of concerts held in Vence.  The town blocks the entrances to the town a couple of hours before the start, in order to verify tickets of attendees and for those who are already inside the area, tickets are asked for and confirmed.

Since it had been rainy and the central area chairs were wet, we decided to sit on the terrace of a restaurant located just across from the stage area.  It was perfect as a dry, front row table for two with views of the large stage screens.  I found it amusing that my name was written as a name of nobility with ‘de’ and yes, it was a royal evening full of good food and music.

We listened to and enjoyed the singing of Maya Kamaty, followed by tango music by Plaza Francia. (videos below)

See remaining program HERE

 

concert logo

French Jazz Fans outsmart Hitler

Article written by Margo Lestz (The Curious Rambler)- Reblogged with permission:

France has a special place in its heart for jazz and in the summer, you’ll find jazz festivals all over the country. In fact, the world’s first international jazz festival was held in Nice, France in 1948. But France’s relationship with this music started some 30 years earlier during the World War I and developed under some interesting circumstances during the Nazi Occupation of World War II.

Jazz comes to France

During World War I, African-American soldiers introduced France to jazz. After the war, this lively new sound was the perfect accompaniment to les années folles, or “the crazy years”, when all art forms were changing and tastes turned to the unconventional and exotic. This new African-American music made people feel alive again, just what was needed after the horrors of the First World War.

Miles Davis statue – Negresco hotel in Nice.  Photo by Margo Lestz

Miles Davis statue – Negresco hotel in Nice. Photo by Margo Lestz

Hot Club

Jazz was especially appreciated by the young and in the early 1930s, a group of Parisian students formed a jazz club. At first they just met to listen to the music, but later they became ambassadors of this new sound. The Hot Club de France quickly grew into an important organisation working to promote jazz in France. Hugues Panassié was president and Charles Delaunay secretary, but in 1936 Louis Armstrong was elected Honorary President of the club and held that title until his death in 1971.

French Jazz

With the help of the Hot Club, jazz took root in post-war France. Although they appreciated the American jazz groups, the Hot Club was on the lookout for French talent. They “discovered” guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stéphane Grappelli who, along with others, became known as the Hot Club Quintet, the first “all French” jazz band.

Jazz during the occupation

When the Second World War was declared, most of the African American jazz musicians left France and the French bands were worried. Hitler wasn’t a jazz fan. He considered it a tool of the Jews and detrimental to society.

But, Hitler was more tolerant in France than in other countries. He wanted to remain on good terms with the French and use their resources for his war effort. He also planned to make Paris a recreation centre for his troops so he encouraged the entertainment industry there. Foreign tunes were absolutely forbidden but he allowed traditional music, thinking his propaganda would be better accepted if it was broadcast along with popular songs.

“Frenchified” jazz

The Hot Club took advantage of this situation and set about creating a “French history” for jazz, proclaiming it a traditional French form of music. They held conferences explaining how jazz was directly inspired by Debussy, an influential French composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and circulated flyers detailing this invented pedigree.

They wrote books to convince Hitler and the Vichy regime of the merits of French jazz. One music critic published a book explaining how it was intrinsically French and how it could become the new European music under the Nazi regime. Hugues Panassié, president of the Hot Club, published a book addressing the Vichy regime’s argument that jazz couldn’t carry a patriotic message. In his book he claimed that jazz had simply been misunderstood and he scattered biblical passages and political quotes throughout to make it sound convincing.

louis_armstrong_aquarium_04Louis Armstrong disguised as a French man (photo: The Curious Rambler)

It’s not swing, it’s jazz

Music experts pointed out that the jazz musicians of the time were all French (the American musicians had left at the start of the war) and they made “adjustments” to make jazz seem more French. At the time the music was called “swing” in France so they started calling it “jazz” which sounded less American.

It’s not blues, it’s tristesse

The titles of songs were changed to French: “St. Louis Blues” became “Tristesse de St. Louis” and “I Got Rhythm” became “Agate Rhythm”. The names of composers were either left off or changed. Louis Armstrong’s songs were credited to Jean Sablon during that time. When they had finished, jazz looked as French as baguettes and brie. Their efforts paid off when the Nazis banned subversive “American swing” but permitted traditional “French jazz”. Of course, it was the same music, just cleverly repackaged.

Jazz and the Resistance

Hot Club members weren’t just defying the Nazis with music, many of them were active members of the Resistance. They used jazz concerts and conferences as cover to pass information to England. In 1943 the Hot Club headquarters in Paris was raided and some of its officials were arrested. Delaunay, Hot Club secretary, was released after one month, but several of the others perished in Nazi concentration camps.

However, jazz survived and kept the French company during the occupation. And when the war was over, France remained faithful to the music that, by that time, really had become woven into French culture.

Click on the video below to see Louis Armstrong learning a song in French with Claudine Panassié, daughter-in-law of Hugues Panassié, president of the Hot Club and director of the 1948 Nice Jazz Festival. It was filmed in 1969 at Armstrong’s home in Corona, New York.

History of the Nice Jazz Festival:

1948 – Nice hosted the first international jazz festival in the world. Louis Armstrong was the headliner and performances were in the opera house and the municipal casino (which once stood in Place Massena).

1972-1973 – The next jazz festival in Nice took place 23 years later. The performances were held in the garden Albert I.

1974 – The Nice jazz festival returned under the name, Grande Parade du Jazz. Musicians played on three stages in the open spaces of the garden of Cimiez. The Nice jazz festival has continued since 1974.

1994 – The name was changed to Nice Jazz Festival.

2011 – The festival moved back into the centre of town and to the garden Albert I where two stages welcome multiple performers each evening.

French Riviera Fireworks

070811_1913~01Summer 2014

JULY

Wed 9:  Cannes *

Fri 11:  Le Lavandou

Sat 12:  Cagnes-sur-Mer (Hippodrome) & Roquebrune Cap Martin

Sun 13:  Agay, Antibes, Bormes-les-Mimosas, Cagnes-sur-Mer, Golfe Juan, La Figueirette

Mon 14:  Beaulieu-sur-Mer, Cannes, Cavalaire, Juan-les-Pins, Le Lavandou, Menton, Nice, Port Grimaud, St. Laurent du Var, Ste. Maxime, St. Raphael, St. Tropez, Théoule

Tues 15:  La Napoule (Château)

Sat. 19:  Cagnes-sur-Mer (Hippodrome), Monaco

Mon 21:  Cannes *

Fri 25:  Cagnes-sur-Mer (Hippodrome), Le Lavandou

Sun 27:  Monaco

Tues 29:  Cannes *

Wed 30:  La Napoule

AUGUST

Fri 1:  Juan-les-Pins, Le Lavandou

Sun 3:  St. Raphael

Thurs 7:  Cannes *

Fri 8:  Juan-les-Pins, Le Lavandou

Sat 9:  Monaco, St. Jean Cap Ferrat

Tues 12:  La Napoule

Thurs 14:  Agay, Cagnes-sur-Mer, Roquebrune Cap Martin, San Remo

Fri 15:  Cagnes-sur-Mer (Hippodrome), Cannes, Juan-les-Pins, Le Lavandou, Menton, Nice, Port Grimaud, Ste. Maxime, St. Raphael, St. Tropez, Théoule

Sat 16:  Monaco

Sun 17:  Bormes les Mimosas

Fri 22:  Cagnes-sur-Mer (Hippodrome), Le Lavandou

Sat 23:  Cagnes-sur-Mer (Hippodrome), la Napoule

Sun 24:  Antibes, Cannes *

Fri 29:  Le lavandou

* Check out the annual International Firework Festival in Cannes
(Festival d’art pyrotéchnique de Cannes)

(Schedule not all inclusive – check local Tourist Office sites for more information)

Source:  Riviera Reporter

Jazz au Château in a Medieval Village

Beginning July 4th and every Friday evening during the summer months of July and August, the medieval village of Haut-de-Cagnes-sur-Mer (just outside of Nice) hosts a free evening of jazz in the Place du Château, accessible via the village’s free shuttle bus #44 (link for schedule) originating from the Gare Routière in Cagnes-sur-Mer.

♫♫ Come on babe – Why don’t we paint the town?  And all that Jazz!! ♫♫

Jazz au chateau1

Jazz au chateau2

July & All That Jaaaazzzz!

Lineup for 2014 Nice Jazz Festival Redefines Eclectic“The annual Nice Jazz Festival has enjoyed great success in recent years, even after the controversial move from its spiritual home in the hills of Cimiez, down to the lowlands of Place Masséna. The 2014 edition looks to be as interesting as ever, with quite an eclectic lineup of artists and acts — where else will you find Deep Purple, Har Mar Superstar and De La Soul on the same bill? This is a jazz showcase, right?”

Running from July 8-12th, there will be great performances by The Gypsy Kings, Ed Motta & the Nice Orchestra Horns, Electro Deluxe and Richard Galliano and the Nice Jazz Orchestra, Dr John & the Nite Trippers featuring Sarah Morrow and Keziah Jones.  The festival will take place on two stages in the center of Nice, one in the Theatre de Verdure and the other on Scene Massena where you can conveniently walk from one performance to another.  (Source/credit: Riviera Buzz)
This year, Nice Mayor Christian Estrossi organized the largest human saxophone in Place Massena on June 21st, setting a new Guinness Book world record, with 1660 locals, and marking the first day of summer and la Fête de la Musique.
jazz photo

Nice jazz schedule, video, and read more HERE

 

See below for Antibes/Juan-les-Pins
antibes jazzPhoto credit: The Riviera Times

 

Riviera Polo Club

I recently attended the annual “Champagne & Chukkas” event for the first time, and as a member of the International Club of the Riviera, enjoyed watching the Riviera Polo Club event from their sponsor’s tent.
SAVETHEDATEJUNE

As a former equestrian (hunter/jumper and fox-hunting), it was truly a Proust-like moment for me: the sweet smell of the hay in the air, the soft feel of petting a pony and a horse, and the ingrained muscle memory of riding – the pleasant odors and familiar sights lingered all around me.

Champagne, horses, and dancing were the highlights of the day and evening – et bien sûr, mingling with friends and new acquaintances.

A great day and an enjoyable event – I just wish now that I had kept my custom riding boots!

RPC photo

Riviera Polo Club photo

 

 

Chamber Music Event

I enjoy listening to most all types of music and especially like chamber music – most notably, baroque music by Jean-Baptiste Lully, composer and chef d’orchestre for Louis XIV.

The Berliner Camerata will be performing compositions by Mozart, Bach, and Vivaldi at the Basilique Notre Dame, a Neo-Gothic basilica built between 1864 and 1868 and is the largest church in Nice, but it is not a cathedrale, like the baroque-style Cathedrale St. Reparate in Nice.  So what’s the difference, you ask, too? 

“The difference between a cathedral and a basilica is that a cathedral is a church which acts as home to the bishop`s throne (cathedra) that is the central church in his diocese while a basilica refers to a church’s architecture and importance to the pope. A Basilica refers also to permanent designation for church building.” (wikipedia)

No matter what the setting, this concert sounds like a great one (no pun intended!)

concert
Tickets at FNAC HERE

held at the Notre Dame Church at 37, Av. Jean Medecin, Nice

Tram stop:  Nice Etoile