9 Beautiful French Proverbs That Will Impress

Want to astound native speakers with your French?

Then along with your French slang and French idioms, you must learn some French proverbs!

These beauties are filled with both imagery and wisdom, and can be used in everyday situations.

Here are nine French proverbs (brief sayings encompassing advice and general truths) and their meanings, which will give sel (salt/savor) to your use of the language, and a certain poésie (poetic flair) in the way you communicate.

9 Beautiful French Proverbs That Will Impress

1. “Qui vivra verra”

“Qui vivra verra”  is a widely used and understood proverb that literally means, “He/she who lives, shall see.” This phrase is usually used when an outcome is unpredictable or uncertain, like in the English “the future will tell.” Although it is a very short phrase, it still rolls smoothly off the tongue with elegance.

2. “L’habit ne fait pas le moine”

commonly applied french proverbs flair beauty impress1 9 Beautiful French Proverbs That Will Impress

“L’habit ne fait pas le moine” translates to “The vestment does not make the monk.” Its significance, though, is that just because a monk is wearing a renunciate’s robe, it doesn’t mean that the monk is sincere in his intentions. The English equivalent would be, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” The sense of the phrase implies that appearances can sometimes mislead one’s better judgement. The philosopher Plutarch came up with his own rendition of this phrase. It goes, “A beard does not make a philosopher,” which in French is translated as “La barbe ne fait pas le philosophe.”

3. “Chacun voit midi à sa porte”

Chacun voit midi à sa porte” is a beautiful expression which, while being somewhat unfortunate, is nevertheless quite true. The literal translation goes, “Everyone sees noon at his doorstep.” It means that every individual is occupied, first and foremost, with his or her own personal interests, and each feels their subjective opinions as objective truths. When such tenacity occurs, the French would say, “Inutile de discuter,” it is “useless to argue,” since every man feels he is right. Innumerable are the contexts in which this phrase may be used, and it would impress a French person to hear it from a foreigner.

4. “Mieux vaut prévenir que guérir”

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Mieux vaut prévenir que guérir” is another widely used proverb, understood by all French natives. It literally means, “It is better to prevent than to heal,” and interestingly, it’s the first principle of traditional Chinese healing practices. The French are very attached to this saying, dearly using it on a regular basis. It is not surprising, however, since health is first priority – “Et d’abord, ne pas nuire!” (First, do no harm!), they say. The sense of the proverb is such that it is better to take the necessary precautions to prevent a sickness, than to have to treat and heal this sickness. It is sens commun (common sense) in France, undoing the dictum, “Ignorance is bliss,” for the bliss in this case is to not be ignorant, but preventive.

5. “Petit a petit, l’oiseau fait son nid”

commonly applied french proverbs flair beauty impress4 9 Beautiful French Proverbs That Will Impress

“Petit a petit, l’oiseau fait son nid” is a charming little phrase that’s widely applied, and translated as, “Little by little, the bird makes its nest.” This proverb designates patience and perseverance. It can be used in many situations, particularly in the process of something not yet accomplished, as opposed to something that has been accomplished. And only then, after much time and effort, one might also say (with a pronounced sense of triumph and achievement), “Paris ne s’est pas fait en un jour!” (“Paris was not made in a day!”)

6. “Qui court deux lievres a la fois, n’en prend aucun”

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“Qui court deux lievres a la fois, n’en prend aucun” is a marvel not only in its implication, but in its wonderful imagery. It is translated as, “Who runs after two hares at the same time, catches none.” The meaning is that an individual ought to concentrate on one task at a time with optimal attention, if that task is to be well done. If a person does two things at once, the likelihood is that the end result will be anchored in mediocrity, due to a half-hearted effort. Something well done is something done with total concentration. This proverb offers an important reminder, so it can be wisely applied to many various situations.

7. “Qui n’avance pas, recule”

“Qui n’avance pas, recule” is a truth that none can counter. It is translated as, “Who does not move forward, recedes”. There can be no standstill in life, only evolution or devolution. Either one evolves, or one devolves. To be stagnant is the same as to recede. “Expect poison from stagnant water,” the English poet William Wordsworth once wrote. This proverb can be used as encouragement in the need to persevere. It may be persistently employed, given its truth content.

8. “Quand on a pas ce que l’on aime, il faut aimer ce que l’on a”

commonly applied french proverbs flair beauty impress7 9 Beautiful French Proverbs That Will Impress

“Quand on a pas ce que l’on aime, il faut aimer ce que l’on a” is a beautifully worded proverb that’s full of good sense. Its translation is, “When one doesn’t have the things that one loves, one must love what one has.” It reflects the saying, “Want what you have and you’ll have what you want,” which is to say that you must be content with what you currently hold, however little it may be. In this way, we avoid the burden of wanting things out of reach, and become grateful for the things that are before us now. If you say this proverb at the appropriate time, the French will surely be intrigued by such wisdom, and perhaps commend you for it with a “perrier” or a glass of wine.

9. “Il n’y a pas plus sourd que celui qui ne veut pas entendre”

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Il n’y a pas plus sourd que celui qui ne veut pas entendre” is a proverb “qui court les rues” (that runs the streets, meaning it’s widely used). It translates as, “No one is as deaf as the one who does not want to listen.” This would be the case for very stubborn people, or those so caught up in their own self-assertions that they pay no heed to the advice or opinions of others. The French, especially Parisians, are intellectual ringleaders. You might say that in Paris, debating is almost a sport. When a debate leads nowhere because of the tenacity on both sides, this proverb is likely to be used by either one or both of the parties (if each believe they are right).

So there you have it – nine proverbs to refine and give flair to your use of the French language. If you keep these sayings in your repertoire intellectuel (intellectual repertoire), you will find your ability to impress the French significantly increased.

Do not forget that these are “widely applied” French proverbs, and their usage is very flexible. Within the space of a day, many occurrences would arise in which you could slip one or more of these in your day-to-day conversations. They will have instantaneous chameleon effect, because French people would (usually) only expect a French native to say these. You saying one will either amaze the French person, or give off the impression that you have refined mastery of the language. It is a cunning way to gain a foothold in French conversational territory, which is why rehearsing and applying them will only bring greater eloquence, clarity and cordial magnetism in your meetings with the French.

SOURCE:  FluentU
French Immersion Online HERE

Language Lundi #1

On any given Monday, I will post French language exercises of various levels, to help you improve your language learning – bonne chance & stay tuned!

C’est en forgeant qu’on devient forgeron! (Practice makes perfect)

Unscramble the letters to find four verbs:

eanhrtc

sadrne

rotirs

laclieciru

(all answers below)

crossword 2-24-14

Credit: LivingFrance

Answers:

Verbs: chanter, danser, sortir, accueillir

Crossword:

Across: 1-sourd; 4-obeir; 7-geste; 11-taupes; 13-litteraire; 14-essence; 15-magasin; 16-deja; 18-etes; 19-herbace; 21-athee; 22-belge; 24-pluie; 28-sentier; 29-haïr; 30-vent; 32-dejeune; 34-disparu; 36-toutlememe; 37-rasoir; 38-etant; 39-fumer; 40-annee

Down: 2-orage; 3-repassage; 5-bellemere; 6-intime; 8-epais; 9-tyran; 10-peigner; 12-singes; 17-entre; 20-chien; 23-grandpere; 25-livraison; 26-mesurer; 27-briser; 31- devenu; 32-droit; 33-jeton; 35-utile

Do you speak Versaillais?

Match the English phrase with its Versaillais equivalent.

(Trouver la phrase correspondante.)

1. Fancy dress ball                              a. Palefrenier

2. Sutler                                                 b. Tapisserie

3. Farrier                                                c. Bal paré

4. Scoundrel                                          d. Dauphin

5. Coach                                                  e. Cuirasse

6. Harpsichord                                      f. Vivandier

7. Groom                                                  g. Maréchal

8. Frill of a shirt                                     h. Jabot

9. Tapestry                                               i. Manchettes

10. Armored breast plate                    j. Hauts de chausses

11. Eldest son of the king                    k. Faïence

12. Crockery                                            l.  Rigole

13. Small channel                                 m. Carrosse

14. Breeches                                            n. Clavecin

15. Huntsman                                        o. Ecurie

16. Candlestick                                      p. Cavalcade

17. Parlor                                                 q. Bougeoir

18. Chancellor                                       r. Chancelier

19. Arbor                                            s. Levée et couchée du roi

20. Rising and retiring                        t. Salon

21. Horse procession                           u. Bosquet

22. Stables                                               v. Chasseur

23. Foil                                                     w. Fleuret

24. Marsh                                                x. Gredin

25. Cuff ruffle                                        y. Marécage

26. Hamlet                                              z. Le Hameau

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Answers :

1c; 2f ; 3g; 4x; 5m; 6n; 7a; 8h; 9b; 10e; 11d; 12k; 13l; 14j; 15v; 16q; 17t; 18r; 19u; 20s; 21p; 22o; 23w; 24y; 25i; 26z

(Source : fusac.fr)

Learning French – Oui, French Today!

Of course, one can learn a language at any age, although it has been proven easier to do before the age of 13,  due to the brain’s stages of development.

I went back to university as an adult to earn a B.A. in French – a “fait accompli” in three years time; the focus was mostly on learning to read and write French. Bien sûr, there were the required grammar classes and a lot of literature classes, but surprisingly not many French conversation classes. So, learning was how to speak textbook French, which is not always what’s truly spoken.  Afterwards, when I lived and worked in Paris, this all became amusingly quite evident (read about it in “Solitary Desire – One Woman’s Journey to France” – available on Amazon)!

Spoken French is like spoken English, where words are slurred together, spoken quickly, and includes slang.  I have a good friend who takes lessons via skype with French Today (click on the image icon on the left sidebar on my blog for direct access) to improve her speaking ability, and she highly recommends the company.  They also have a variety of listening programs & lessons in communicating in modern day French.

What a great idea, as well, to give as a gift to a Francophile friend!  Let’s speak French (Parlons français) and oui, let’s speak French Today!

 

French Conjugation Exercise

Sabine aime dormir.  Elle est très affairée mais elle (prendre)   le temps de faire un petit dodo chaque après-midi.  Elle   (descendre)   trente minutes après, les cheveux en bataille et une joue rosée, mais rafraîchie après sa petite détente.  (faire)   la preuve vous-même ! dit-elle toujours.  Elle le conseille à tout le monde.  (essayer)    -le une fois et vous   (voir)   combien  (se sentir)   mieux.

 

 

Answers:

1 – prend

2 –  descend

3 – Faites

4 – Essayez

5 – verrez

6 – vous vous sentirez

 

Source: AP French

How To Speak French? C’est amusant!

I am a strong proponent of learning to speak French, especially if you live here.  My language learning took years, with many starts and stops along the way, as described in the book, “Solitary Desire.”  As a former teacher of French, I can attest that foreign language learning is an ongoing process – with progress mainly through practice, practice, and more practice.

C’est en forgeant que l’on devient forgeron!    (practice makes perfect)

But really, does it truly become perfect??  Je crois que non !

I find this video amusing and very entertaining!  What’s your take?

To Each His/Her Own…Dream !

chicken

WHAT’S YOUR DREAM?

READ ABOUT MINE:
Book CoverSolitary Desire – One Woman’s Journey to France”  featured as Spotlight Blitz Book Tour on Buy The Book Tours site, as well as on their tour partners/hosts’ sites.

A true story of living one’s life dream!

4.6/5.0 in reviews

Available as an E-book and paperback on Amazon, Createspace, and Smashwords.1519847_orig

New Language Law = FR-exting?

The following is in followup to my previous post about French language laws, in order to prevent the increasing intrusion of English-isms.

There was an article in the Le Figaro (online version) concerning text messaging (sending and receiving SMS) within France;  it refers to the use of all languages other than French when texting.

“As of Friday, April 5th, the new law dictates that a maximum of 12% of all SMS traffic within the French telecommunications system in foreign languages will be allowed (Loi 2872bis, Décret 842a, 18 Mars 2013, Loi concernant l’utilisation des langues étrangères dans les télécommunications).  Apparently, expressions such as ‘le weekend’, ‘le parking’, ‘bye bye’, ‘email’ and ‘ciao,’ that have become firmly implanted in the French vocabulary, are targeted.  In addition, for ‘email’ the French equivalent ‘courriel’ is now expected.

The most worrying part of the new law is the fact that once daily quotas are full, texts in entirely (or partly) foreign language and even using a single non-French word will be blocked.

A member of the French parliament has followed this up by proposing that all websites based in France must now contain a minimum of 33.3% French language content! Plus, all foreign language sites must offer the possibility of full availability in French.  He has also suggested that chat rooms and other facilities have limits similar to the mobile telephone regulations. It remains to be seen if this becomes law as well.”

En principe, I understand the desire to maintain French heritage and culture, but it will be interesting to see how this plays out en réalité!

(Source: Le Figaro)

French…Fried with a Side of English

“French say ‘non’ to the term hashtag in battle to stop English words violating their language:

The French Government has banned the Twitter term ‘hashtag’ from all official documents in their latest bid to ban a torrent of English words invading their language.

The Government’s powerful Académie française has decreed that the French word ‘mot-dièse’ must be spoken when the ‘#’ symbol appears in print.

Teachers have been told to urge schoolchildren to use the term, and the media has also been asked to avoid using the English word.

Non, non, non: these English-speaking Twitter users are unimpressed with l’Academie’s solution

The outlawing of ‘hashtag’ is the latest in a flood of orders from the Académie, the state body appointed to protect the French language.

The French culture ministry recently put up a huge list of English words on its website which it said had slipped into common French usage and should be banned.

These included ’email’, ‘blog’, ‘supermodel’, ‘take-away’, ‘chewing gum’, ‘parking’, ‘weekend’ and ‘low-cost airline’.

Now the Goverment’s Official Journal, which publishes new laws and decrees, wrote this week: ‘The English term hashtag should wherever possible be replaced with the French term “mot-dièse”.’ The plural is mots-diese.

Seat of power: l’Academie exists to preserve the purity of the French language and has also resisted words such as ‘take-away’ and ‘weekend’

But critics swiftly pointed out that the two words are technically different, with the English hashtag symbol leaning to the right and denoting an abbreviation for ‘number’, equivalent to ‘no.’,
while the ‘dièse’ – the French term for the ‘sharp’ sign used in music – is vertical.

Users of Twitter took to the site to air their views. Some complained that you can’t hashtag mot-dièse because it contains a hyphen. Another noted the news with the mocking hashtag #fightingalosingbattle.

Critics charged if a French word must be found for the contentious symbol, then it should be ‘croisillon’ (meaning cross-piece or lattice) rather than a dièse (sharp sign). Several users tried to generate momentum for their campaign using the hashtag (sorry, mot-dièse) #teamcroisillon.

La resistance! Another faction calls for the word ‘croisillon’ to be used instead of ‘mot-diese’

The hashtag is just one foreign invasion l’Académie is wishing to see off. Even such obscure terms as ‘shadow-boxing’, ‘detachable motor caravan’ and ‘multifunctional industrial building’ were blacklisted over 65 pages of forbidden vocabulary on the Journal’s website.

Scientists were told to no longer refer to ‘serial analysis of gene expression’ and ‘suppression subtractive hybridisation’.

And television sports commentators are being advised to stop using the word ‘coach’ or ‘corner’ for football matches. They should instead say ‘entraineur’ and ‘coup de pied de coin’.

The French Government commissioned a report into English usage two years ago, which warned that the global domination of Anglo-Saxon culture had plunged the future of the French language into a ‘deep crisis’.

The report said: ‘English-speakers have a vision of the so-called English-speaking world, but an equivalent concept does not seem to exist in France.

‘Despite having 200 million French-speakers on earth, the idea of a French-speaking world is becoming obsolete.

‘France is failing to promote its own language, and there seems to be very little interest in doing so.”

DO YOU AGREE THAT FRENCH IS BECOMING OBSOLETE?

Dailymail.co.uk

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk